nationalpost
Esta es de las cosas más tristes que he leído, matar a un osito sólo por ser amigable?  :’(

nationalpost:

Bear cub that gained web fame euthanizedA bear cub that gained fame when it had its photo snapped with a Newfoundland RCMP officer has been killed because it was feared to be too friendly. Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers with the Department of Justice euthanized the bear on the weekend after it was seen going up to customers at the Copper Kettle Restaurant inside Terra Nova National Park, near Gander. It had already proved to be a traffic hazard on the nearby Trans-Canada Highway. (Photo: Cst. Suzanne Bourque and the bear cub. Handout/RCMP)

Esta es de las cosas más tristes que he leído, matar a un osito sólo por ser amigable?  :’(

nationalpost:

Bear cub that gained web fame euthanized
A bear cub that gained fame when it had its photo snapped with a Newfoundland RCMP officer has been killed because it was feared to be too friendly. Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers with the Department of Justice euthanized the bear on the weekend after it was seen going up to customers at the Copper Kettle Restaurant inside Terra Nova National Park, near Gander. It had already proved to be a traffic hazard on the nearby Trans-Canada Highway. (Photo: Cst. Suzanne Bourque and the bear cub. Handout/RCMP)

Hay cosas que vemos todos los días y al acostumbrarnos a ellas nos parecen bastante simples, sin embargo, si miramos con atención podríamos sorprendernos (y más si hay un macro de por medio).

Estas fotos fueron tomadas por un profesor de física armenio, Suren Manvelyan.

It is quite natural when you shoot macro shots of insects and plants, but to try to make a picture of the eye? I did not expect these results,” says Suren.

“I was not aware they are of such complicated appearance. Everyday we see hundreds of eyes but do not even suspect they have such beautiful structure, like surfaces of unknown planets.”  

Esta idea me pareció de lo más peculiar, y lamentable u.u

Si alguno de ustedes tiene por ahí un Nintendo GameCube que ya no use o que no funcione, siempre hay alternativas, como por ejemplo ¡convertirlo en un organizador de escritorio! 

Es un gran desperdicio del potencial de esta consola, pero por lo menos les alegrará su lugar de trabajo.

También se pueden comprar aquí: http://www.etsy.com/listing/68292827/gamecube-desktop-organizer-black?ref=sr_gallery_8&ga_search_query=zelda&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_page=4&ga_search_type=handmade&ga_facet=handmade

fastcompany
fastcompany:

Our man Chuck Salter writes about how his dad found the handwritten Coke recipe that’s been making the Internet rounds today.


My dad, Charles Salter, took that photograph 32 years ago as a columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The column was called the “Georgia Rambler.” He’d travel the state looking for colorful people and places, often stories with a historical bent. One of his best sources was the late Everett Beal, a fishing buddy of his who worked as a pharmacist in Griffin, Ga. One day, Everett showed my dad his prized possession, a leather-bound book of recipes that had once belonged to a pharmacist named John Pemberton. The John Pemberton who created the original syrup to make Coke.
“Coco Cola Improved” was scrawled by hand on page 188, above a list of ingredients. My dad asked Everett if he thought it was the original formula for Coke. “I believe it is,” Everett told him.

Meanwhile, back in Atlanta, my dad showed a photo of the recipe to Coke and asked them the same question. “We don’t as a company comment on or confirm or deny any information you present to us about the formula for Coca-Cola,” my Dad quoted a spokesman saying.
You would think a column blowing the lid off Coke’s big secret would be front-page news in its home-town paper. A column with a photo of the recipe. But on February 18, 1979, “Is It Real Thing in Old Book?” ran inside the local news section, on 2B. And that was that. Remember, this was pre-Internet. This was even pre-cable news. CNN wouldn’t launch for another year. So the Coke column remained a favorite story my dad would recount, and he’d bring out that old photo of the recipe book cradled in Everett Beal’s weathered hands.



Swag. He goes into his dad’s reaction upon finding out that the story went viral and other fun stuff. Definitely worth reading in full.

Para los que aún se preguntan cómo diablos fue que se dio a conocer la receta secreta de Coca Cola, aquí está la historia, lo gracioso es que no fue gracias a un espía dentro de los cuárteles de la compañia, tampoco alguien le puso una pistola en la cabeza a Robert W. Woodruff (actual presidente de Coca Cola) para que revelara el secreto, simplemente se descubrió en una página al aire de un periódico de 1979… brillante cierto?

fastcompany:

Our man Chuck Salter writes about how his dad found the handwritten Coke recipe that’s been making the Internet rounds today.

My dad, Charles Salter, took that photograph 32 years ago as a columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The column was called the “Georgia Rambler.” He’d travel the state looking for colorful people and places, often stories with a historical bent. One of his best sources was the late Everett Beal, a fishing buddy of his who worked as a pharmacist in Griffin, Ga. One day, Everett showed my dad his prized possession, a leather-bound book of recipes that had once belonged to a pharmacist named John Pemberton. The John Pemberton who created the original syrup to make Coke.

“Coco Cola Improved” was scrawled by hand on page 188, above a list of ingredients. My dad asked Everett if he thought it was the original formula for Coke. “I believe it is,” Everett told him.

Meanwhile, back in Atlanta, my dad showed a photo of the recipe to Coke and asked them the same question. “We don’t as a company comment on or confirm or deny any information you present to us about the formula for Coca-Cola,” my Dad quoted a spokesman saying.

You would think a column blowing the lid off Coke’s big secret would be front-page news in its home-town paper. A column with a photo of the recipe. But on February 18, 1979, “Is It Real Thing in Old Book?” ran inside the local news section, on 2B. And that was that. Remember, this was pre-Internet. This was even pre-cable news. CNN wouldn’t launch for another year. So the Coke column remained a favorite story my dad would recount, and he’d bring out that old photo of the recipe book cradled in Everett Beal’s weathered hands.

Swag. He goes into his dad’s reaction upon finding out that the story went viral and other fun stuff. Definitely worth reading in full.

Para los que aún se preguntan cómo diablos fue que se dio a conocer la receta secreta de Coca Cola, aquí está la historia, lo gracioso es que no fue gracias a un espía dentro de los cuárteles de la compañia, tampoco alguien le puso una pistola en la cabeza a Robert W. Woodruff (actual presidente de Coca Cola) para que revelara el secreto, simplemente se descubrió en una página al aire de un periódico de 1979… brillante cierto?